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Stupid Nonsense!
Stupid Nonsense!
I mostly like climbing, books and obscure rock music.
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hollyblack:

twigbookshop:

Orphan Black is back! In between convincing my kith and kin to binge-watch the first season, quick, I’ve put together a recommendation list for the lovers of cons, clones, and cult-classics in your life. 

Pattern Recognition, by William Gibson 

Sci-fi giant William Gibson’s globe-spinning thriller of corporate shenanigans and human quirks. 

Sekret, by Lindsay Smith 

Cold War espionage meets mad science and superpowers when teenaged psychic Yulia is forced into a world where everyone wants something and no one can be trusted. 

Pawn, by Aimee Carter 

Kitty has a chance at wealth and power in her caste-bound society—if she transforms herself into the prime minister’s niece and dives head first into the plots and rebellion that got her killed. 

Snow Crash, by Neal Stephenson

All-powerful corporations, virtual katana duels, a sass-mouthed skater chick, Sumerian mythology, movie-watching pirates, and hacking the human brain. 

The Likeness, by Tana French

When a corpse turns up bearing not only Detective Cassie Maddox’s likeness but also an ID matching one of Cassie’s old undercover identities, Cassie agrees to go undercover as the murder victim. Then things get complicated. Tana French’s Dublin Murder Squad mysteries are atmospheric, complex, creepy and engrossing. 

White Cat, by Holly Black 

A teenaged grifter with a past gets rapidly in over his head in this genre-bending tale of crime, conspiracy, memory and magic. 

Never Let Me Go, by Kazuo Ishiguro 

It bears no resemblance to Orphan Black in tone, structure, style or philosophy, but Never Let Me Go remains one of my favorite explorations of what it means to be human in a world which may or may not recognize you as such. And there are clones. So it goes on the list. 

Great list! Happy to be a part of it!




laurencombeferre:

 (via whoistorule)




maisonmartinmargielous:

Always carry yourself like you just got best photo in Americas Next Top Model even when your life feels like you’re constantly in the bottom two




lokilaufeysonthefrostgiant:

drunkonfairyblood:

bringingsherlockbach:

Celebrities taking the underground

What fucking subway is this




buzzfeed:

mildlyamused:

In which Trixie is the Internet.




smiles-sunsets-and-sarcasm:

That awful moment when you learn that this wasn’t scripted. That Will Smith’s character was actually supposed to brush off the whole thing, but Will’s father actually had left him when he was younger and he just fell apart on the set and the hug at the end was from one actor to another, not one character to another…





“Dwarves show up a lot in fantasy genre, but when they do, they’re these sorts of caricatures, woodland creatures or the punchline of jokes,” Dinklage says. “Nobody gives them a romance. Nobody gives them fully formed personalities, and Tyrion is one of the richest characters I have ever come across. He’s a human being.”
— Peter Dinklage

“Dwarves show up a lot in fantasy genre, but when they do, they’re these sorts of caricatures, woodland creatures or the punchline of jokes,” Dinklage says. “Nobody gives them a romance. Nobody gives them fully formed personalities, and Tyrion is one of the richest characters I have ever come across. He’s a human being.”

— Peter Dinklage




"

Forgiveness.

The ability to forgive oneself. Stop here for a few breaths and think about this, because it is the key to making art and very possibly the key to finding any semblance of happiness in life. Every time I have set out to translate the book (or story, or hopelessly long essay) that exists in such brilliant detail on the big screen of my limbic system onto a piece of paper (which, let’s face it, was once a towering tree crowned with leaves and a home to birds), I grieve for my own lack of talent and intelligence. Every. Single. Time. Were I smarter, more gifted, I could pin down a closer facsimile of the wonders I see. I believe that, more than anything else, this grief of constantly having to face down our own inadequacies is what keeps people from being writers. Forgiveness, therefore, is key. I can’t write the book I want to write, but I can and will write the book I am capable of writing. Again and again throughout the course of my life I will forgive myself.

" - In her beautiful meditation on the writing life, Ann Patchett adds to our ongoing archive of wisdom on writing. Pair with Patchett’s advice to graduates on writing and life. (via explore-blog)